SUCCESS STORY:

MyGo Transforming lives,

from wheelchair to walking.

After four years of being left paralysed from the chest down, Ali Johnston is getting back on his feet and can now push his daughter on the swing; thanks to MyGo and Conductive Transfers ElastaTrode technology.

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Prototype electrodes.

Ali Paraplegic patient testing.

Ali Johnston, 38, was left unable to walk after being struck by a car. He can now take a few steps thanks to the newly developed MyGo leggings. The wearable, designed by Jude Simms and David Powney of MyGo, is a soft garment exoskeleton with built-in conductive transfer electrodes. The electrodes send electrical impulses to specific muscles and nerves sequentially, throughout the body, helping people with spinal-cord injuries or neurological issues to stand, balance, step and walk. MyGo has developed this life-changing product with our ElastaTrode™ technology; MyGo has had multiple successful trials with our prototypes, such as Ali Johnston, helping paraplegic patients on their journey to walking again. 

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Ali Johnston with is daughter, Kasey.

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Ali undergoes intensive physiotherapy.

Mr Johnston spent a year in hospital after the crash but hopes the wearable technology will allow him to play more with his five-year-old daughter, Kasey. 

 

“I’ll get to take my little girl to the park and push her on the swings,” he said.

 

“It’s an absolutely brilliant stretch when you get up. I forget how tall I am, everybody forgets how tall I am, but it’s just a wonderful thing."

 

“With the signals going through you, the legs are just itching. Everything’s just itching to go.”

There are an estimated 1 Billion people worldwide who have a neurological disorder. 

Over 80% of these people would benefit from MyGo’s product.

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Testing has taken place with patients at MyGo’s clinic in Scotland. The wearable garments work with either a pressure trigger, a movement sensor or a manual switch to initiate movement and gait. The garments have 32 strategically placed printed conductive electrodes, that can be activated and programmed, dependent upon the patient’s condition. The trigger starts and stops the movement whilst the software fires the muscles and nerves sequentially.

MyGo has used this method to test their theory and product with Stroke, Parkinson’s, MS and SCI Paraplegic patients. The different neurological conditions use differing electrodes, firing in different orders. They’ve also boosted the electrical signal to muscles in elderly patients to help them with their continued mobility, which may have significant implications in fall prevention, hip fractures, and hospital admissions.

Testing has taken place with patients at MyGo’s clinic in Scotland. The wearable garments work with either a pressure trigger, a movement sensor or a manual switch to initiate movement and gait. The garments have 32 strategically placed printed conductive

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In 2022, MyGo won the Elevator UK Innovation of the Year Award.

electrodes, that can be activated and programmed, dependent upon the patient’s condition. The trigger starts and stops the movement whilst the software fires the muscles and nerves sequentially.

MyGo has used this method to test their theory and product with Stroke, Parkinson’s, MS and SCI Paraplegic patients. The different neurological conditions use differing electrodes, firing in different orders. They’ve also boosted the electrical signal to muscles in elderly patients to help them with their continued mobility, which may have significant implications in fall prevention, hip fractures, and hospital admissions.

The results from these comprehensive initial studies have been very favourable. With the garment, a T6 (Complete) paraplegic patient has been able to stand up, sit down, stand independently and step. A patient with MS who had been previously wheelchair-bound and immobile for 10 years is able to walk independently with a walking aid, whilst wearing the garment. Better control of movement patterns & improvements in gait were also achieved when testing the garment with Stroke patients.

 

Importantly one single unit will have the capability to change with the patient as they age or as their condition improves or deteriorates, negating the existing need to purchase multiple pieces of equipment.

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The physios behind MyGo wanted to create something that targets more muscles than other devices on the market, whilst being affordable and easier to wear. The company has two core founding members, who are passionate about their product and their aim to improve the lives of people with spinal cord injuries and those with neurological disabilities.

 

Jude Simms
Is an experienced specialist Neuro Physiotherapist and Team Lead with over 25 years of experience working within the NHS and private sector. 

 

David Powney
Is a movement practitioner who develops mobility solutions for patients with neurological conditions. David also owns and manages a private physio & rehabilitation practice.